Monday, February 13, 2017

THANK YOU To "The Convoy Of Care" - A Group Of Atlanta-Area Law Enforcement Officials Who Saw The Destruction From The Tornadoes That Hit ALBANY GEORGIA And Lead The Charity Drive To Help The Community At A Time Of Need





PLEASE NOTE THE PREDOMINATE RACE OF THE PEOPLE RECEIVING THIS AID




WHAT DID I DO TO HELP? - YOU MAKE ASK

NOTHING (In This Case).
I have reduced my charitable donations given to MY CHURCH and AMERICAN CHARITIES!!
INSTEAD I Have Purposely Shifted These Funds Toward "REST OF WORLD BLACK CAUSES" (In The Caribbean And Africa) WHO NEED THE MONEY MORE AND DON'T HAVE A SAFETY NET TO TURN TO - Unlike Even The "Poorest Of The Poor In America"


WHICH IS A GREATER ASSAULT ON THE MEMORY OF W.E.B. Du BOIS?




Having Dropped All Pretenses That Their EDUCATIONAL ACTIVISM Has ANYTHING TO DO WITH "EDUCATING BLACK PEOPLE" And Is Now Merely PROGRESSIVE NATIONALISM'S FIGHT AGAINST THE WHITE RIGHT WING - The DeVos Lead "US EDUCATION DEPARTMENT'S MISSPELLING OF DuBois' NAME Gets SERVED Nationally As PROOF OF HER INCOMPETENCE
The "Trump" US Department Of Education Is 'Clowned' By The 'Confederation Of Progressive Nationalists Fundamentalist Factions" For Misspelling "W.E.B. DeBois" In A BLACK HISTORY TWEET
Dougherty County Georgia - (And The City Of Albany" ) Played A Central Role in "The Souls Of Black Folks"

Source: WEB DuBois
We seldom study the condition of the Negro to-day hon- estly and carefully. It is so much easier to assume that we know it all. Or perhaps, having already reached conclusions in our own minds, we are loth to have them disturbed by facts. And yet how little we really know of these millions,--of their daily lives and longings, of their homely joys and sorrows, of their real shortcomings and the meaning of their crimes! All this we can only learn by intimate contact with the masses, and not by wholesale arguments covering millions separate in time and space, and differing widely in training and culture. To-day, then, my reader, let us turn our faces to the Black Belt of Georgia and seek simply to know the condition of the black farm-laborers of one county there.
Here in 1890 lived ten thousand Negroes and two thousand whites. The country is rich, yet the people are poor. The keynote of the Black Belt is debt; not commercial credit, but debt in the sense of continued inability on the part of the mass of the population to make income cover expense. This is the direct heritage of the South from the wasteful econo- mies of the slave regime; but it was emphasized and brought to a crisis by the Emancipation of the slaves. In 1860, Dougherty County had six thousand slaves, worth at least two and a half millions of dollars; its farms were estimated at three millions,--making five and a half millions of property, the value of which depended largely on the slave system, and on the speculative demand for land once marvellously rich but already partially devitalized by careless and exhaustive cul- ture. The war then meant a financial crash; in place of the five and a half millions of 1860, there remained in 1870 only farms valued at less than two millions. With this came in- creased competition in cotton culture from the rich lands of Texas; a steady fall in the normal price of cotton followed, from about fourteen cents a pound in 1860 until it reached four cents in 1898. Such a financial revolution was it that involved the owners of the cotton-belt in debt. And if things went ill with the master, how fared it with the man?
The plantations of Dougherty County in slavery days were not as imposing and aristocratic as those of Virginia. The Big House was smaller and usually one-storied, and sat very near the slave cabins. Sometimes these cabins stretched off on either side like wings; sometimes only on one side, forming a double row, or edging the road that turned into the plantation from the main thoroughfare. The form and disposition of the laborers' cabins throughout the Black Belt is to-day the same as in slavery days. Some live in the self-same cabins, others in cabins rebuilt on the sites of the old. All are sprinkled in little groups over the face of the land, centering about some dilapidated Big House where the head-tenant or agent lives. The general character and arrangement of these dwellings remains on the whole unaltered. There were in the county, outside the corporate town of Albany, about fifteen hundred Negro families in 1898. Out of all these, only a single family occupied a house with seven rooms; only fourteen have five rooms or more. The mass live in one- and two-room homes.

ANYONE WHO BELIEVE THAT "SLAVERY DAMAGE" REMAINS AS THE PRIMARY INJURY FOR TODAY'S "AMERICAN CONTAINERIZED BLACKS" - IS HIMSELF IGNORANT TO THE DAMAGE THAT THE "NEGRO HIJINX OF TODAY" IS RENDERING UPON HIS 'EQUILIBRATION" 
THIS IS WHAT YOU HAVE BEEN DEGRADED TO THANKS TO DECADES OF MOLESTATION

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